I Can Recommend… Meat Thermometer Edition

June 02, 2021

By: Lee LeFever

I write books and run a company called Common Craft. I recently moved from Seattle to a rural island. Here, I write about online business, book publishing, modern home construction, and occasionally, dumb jokes.

I realize some may scoff at the use of a thermometer when a “real” chef can just feel when meat is up to temperature. I prefer data.

I use meat thermometers near the end of the cooking process and place the probe into the meat and leave it there until it reaches temperature. I don’t need an app, or settings for different meats. All I want is an accurate reading and a simple alarm for when the meat reaches the temperature I set.

The best thermometer I’ve found for this use is the ThermoWorks Dot.

I’ve also started to use a ThermoPro Infrared Thermometer, which you can point to any surface and get a temperature reading. It’s perfect for getting a pan the perfect temperature for eggs.

Note: I do not have business relationships with the products I recommend and earn no income from writing about them.

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